Words, Water and Work – 2/20/10 Workshop

Good stuff from our friends at the Center for Columbia River History:

Inlet scroll of one of the Francis turbines of the Grand Coulee Dam, during construction.

WORDS, WATER AND WORK

TEACHER WORKSHOP FEBRUARY 20, 2010

COST: FREE

LOCATION: TEX RANKIN THEATER, PEARSON AIR MUSEUM, 1115 E. 5TH ST., VANCOUVER, WA

CONTACT: DONNA SINCLAIR, CENTER FOR COLUMBIA RIVER HISTORY

360-258-3289 or INFO@CCRH.ORG

The Center for Columbia River History’s 2008 James B. Castles Fellow, Chad Wriglesworth, will present a free workshop for history, English, social studies and language arts teachers from 9 a.m.-noon Feb. 20 at the Pearson Air Museum in Vancouver.  “Words, Water, and Work: Literature and History in the Columbia River Basin” will introduce educators to poets, novelists and essayists who have written about the social and ecological transformation of the Columbia River Basin, from the 1930s to the present.

Participants will be provided with illustrative examples of ways that regional history and literature can be integrated into the classroom by investigating places such as Grand Coulee Dam, Bonneville Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Hanford Engineering Works. Teachers will leave the session with a practical teaching bibliography and online resources for future projects and curriculum development. This workshop is open to everyone, but will be of particular interest to language arts and social studies teachers.

Wriglesworth is a former public school teacher with a master’s degree in English from Portland State University and an interdisciplinary master’s degree from Regent College in British Columbia. Wriglesworth has published on Wallace Stegner, Frederick Buechner, Raymond Carver, and C.S. Lewis, with recent publications focused on Pacific Northwest literature and history.  This workshop is based on the research he conducted during his fellowship year with the Center for Columbia River History.

To register, contact Donna Sinclair, info@ccrh.org, 360-258-3289

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